Review: Mercedes-Benz Citan Tourer (2015)

Rating:

Cheapest way to get a seven-seater Mercedes-Benz, available with a petrol engine.

Interior is dated and unsophisticated compared to Ford Tourneo Connect and Volkswagen Caddy, feels too much like the Kangoo.

Recently Added To This Review

18 May 2015 Citan Tourer updated

As well as new technical features, the Citan Traveliner has a new name: the Citan Tourer. This brings the nomenclature for the Citan in line with the new Vito.As from June all Mercedes-Benz Citan Tourer... Read more

13 June 2014 Extra-Long Traveliner Citan launched

Based on the extra-long version of the Citan (length 4,705 mm), with a permissible gross vehicle weight of 2.2 t, the extra-long Traveliner offers a new third seat row, consisting of two individual seats.... Read more

27 November 2013 Retested by Euro NCAP and awarded four stars:

79% Adult protection; 81% Child protection; 56% Pedestrian protection; 70% Safety Assist. The improvements made by Mercedes-Benz to the side airbag deployment proved successful and the Citan scored maximum... Read more

Mercedes-Benz Citan Tourer (2015): At A Glance

It's no secret that the Citan - the smallest van in the Mercedes-Benz range - is based on the Renault Kangoo. You only have to look at the basic shape to realise both are the same van. But unlike the Kangoo, you can get an MPV version - called the Citan Tourer.

Originally called the Traveliner, it is available with seven seats if you go for the extra-long body and represents the cheapest way to get a people carrier with the three-pointed star on the bonnet (well grille). The last time the brand had anything like this was when it launched the short-lived Vaneo.

It's very much in the mould of the original Renault Kangoo and Citroen Berlingo Multispace. In other words a practical, unpretentious and versatile mover that's not ashamed of its van-based origins. If anything the fact it is a van should give buyers plenty of confidence in the build quality and durability.

The looks are nothing to get excited about. In fact the Citan is quite ungainly, especially with the extra-long body as shown in our pictures. If it's style you're after it may be best to look elsewhere. To make it look a little nicer you'll need the optional £695 Appearance Pack which replaces the black plastic bumpers and steel wheels with body-coloured bumpers and mirrors plus 16-inch alloys.

It's a similar story inside with a solid but drab cabin layout in the front. It's fairly utilitarian but also fuss-free, so while there are few bells and whistles, everything is incredible simple to use. The aftermarket-looking stereo is awful though with fiddly buttons. At least it offers good sound plus you can connect your iPod to it.

A 1.2-litre turbo petrol engine is available but most Citan Tourer's are chosen with a diesel. The CDI unit pulls smoothly and while it's no ball of fire, it's a relaxed and quiet enough engine, albeit it not as good as the TDCi in the Ford Transit Connect which has more power and better refinement.

It's difficult to make a case for the Mercedes-Benz Citan compared to the Caddy Maxi Life or Tourneo Connect. Both are better alternatives that are cheaper and come more generously equipped. While the Citan may carry the Mercedes badge, the truth is it feels too much like a Kangoo.

It's dated inside and while the rear is practical, it's not as versatile or as user-friendly as the Ford. The van-based people carrier game has moved on. And it seems the Citan Tourer has been left behind.

What does a Mercedes-Benz Citan Tourer (2015) cost?

Contract hire from £150.00 +VAT pm
Lease from £149.00 +VAT pm

Mercedes-Benz Citan Tourer (2015): What's It Like Inside?

The cabin of the Citan Tourer is solid but drab. But while there are few bells and whistles, everything is at least incredibly simple to use. The aftermarket-looking stereo is awful though with fiddly buttons. At least it offers good sound plus you can connect your iPod to it.

What the Citan Traveliner does offer is practicality. And plenty of it. The sliding side doors on both sides are great if you have to fit child seats and make getting in and out of the back - especially the rearmost row - much easier.

You'll also appreciate them when parked in tight supermarket car parks or multi-storeys. It's a shame then that they feel flimsy and don't slide especially smoothly. On the plus side they do have electric windows fitted.

The extra-long Citan Tourer comes with asymmetrical barn doors at the rear rather than the top-hinged tailgate that's available in the standard 'long' wheelbase model. The barn doors make it easier to access the boot if you're parked in a tight space, but the tailgate can be handy as a shelter - for instance if kids are sat on the boot ledge changing out of muddy wellies.

The middle row of seats is comfortable and offers plenty of headroom and reasonable legroom. It also comes with two Isofix child seat mounting points. Getting to the extra two rear seats is not so easy though - the middle seats only fold forward slightly so you have to clamber over them.

Once there. there's reasonable room for children but older teenagers and adults will find it cramped for knee room. The middle row folds flat easily but annoyingly the rearmost seats have to be removed completely if you want to maximise load space - they're heavy and it's an awkward job.

What's the Mercedes-Benz Citan Tourer (2015) like to drive?

The Traveliner is available with a petrol engine - a 1.2-litre turbocharged unit with 114PS - but not if you go for the extra-long model with seven seats. This limits you to the 109 CDI or 111 CDI models.

Both are powered by the same 1.5-litre Renault-sourced diesel. The 109 CDI offers more than adequate power with 90PS and a decent 200Nm of torque, plus it's economical with a claimed 65.7mpg.

The CDI unit pulls smoothly and while it's no ball of fire, it's a relaxed and quiet enough engine, albeit it not as good as the TDCi in the Ford Transit Connect which has more power and better refinement.

On the motorway the Citan Traveliner cruises along reasonably quietly while the ride is pretty good. It's a touch firm but the dampers are well set up so on poor quality roads the Citan doesn't get too unsettled or noisy.