How can we fight a fraudulent insurance claim?

My mother was following a company owned van down a country back road that appeared to be lost or searching for an address; he was driving a low speed and kept breaking. Suddenly he braked, then put the van in reverse, hitting my mother's van.

They exchanged details, and the driver admitted that this is what had happened. There was a least one person in the front with the driver. However, He has now changed his story, and is saying that my Mother hit him in the rear end, and claims to have a witness (possibly a work colleague with him in the van).

Having seen you advice on similar matters in your Telegraph column, I wondered if you could refresh me as to what you might advise?

Asked on 22 May 2015 by PS123456

Answered by Honest John
His witness in the van is of no relevance because bias can be claimed. But it is obviously always difficult to prove that he reversed into your mother rather than your mother drove into him. You could take the case to small claims and cross examine the driver as to what he was doing at the time. If it can be established that he was looking for an address to deliver something, then that helps to verify your mother's story and there is a chance she would win the case.
Similar questions
The van driver cut in front of my grandson, luckily he was not hurt but his bike was run over. The driver apologised but left the scene without leaving his details. I think he should be reported for this...
My van hit a bicycle lying on the motorway, in the dark, that had fallen off the back of a car in front. Two tyres blew out and the van sustained some cosmetic damage to the bumper and bodywork. Fortunately...
What happens to the valuation of my van if it develops an unrelated mechanical issue while a claim is in progress ?
 

Ask Honest John

Value my van